This auxiliary verb on its own has no meaning, only a grammatical function. That sounds a little confusing so I shall explain: The rule is that you normally only use the Pluperfect when talking about two actions in the past, one of which was already completed before the other one occurred. German Language Stack Exchange is a bilingual question and answer site for speakers of all levels who want to share and increase their knowledge of the German language. In German, subjunctive forms are used much more frequently than in English, to express uncertainty, speculation or doubt. But, like I said, because the Pluperfect is mostly used in subordinate clauses, you also have to observe the sentence structure rules concerning subordinate clauses.

Do you recognize something already? And that looks something like this: In this case you can also refer to it as a „vorzeitiger Nebensatz“, a subordinate clause, in which the action takes place BEFORE the action in the main clause, whereas the main clause already stands in the past or perfect tense. Konjunktiv I—which is formed differently from its younger brother Konjunktiv II—is used chiefly for reporting indirect speech and old fashioned commands.

Now you could talk about both these events in one single sentence structure (main clause and subordinate clause). The verbs ‘to be’, ‘to have’ and the modal verbs (wollen, müssen, können usw.) Never do you say: „Bevor ich ein Auto hatte, hatte ich ein Fahrrad gehabt.“ I have heard such or similar sentences once or twice before, but I can assure you that it is a fundamentally bad style. It is important for you to note that the actual meaning of this sentence no longer lies in the conjugated verb at the end of the subordinate clause but in the Participle II. Never speak like that! If you really want to learn German grammar, I would like to recommend you to use creative learning aids for German as a foreign language.

Then you also already know that the whole sentence structure can also begin with the subordinate clause.

So here is what happens: The verb ‘to learn’ is changed to Participle II and moves from second position to the END of the sentence, just like with the Perfect.

The only difference is that the auxiliary verb ‘to have’ or rather ‘to be’ is in the Simple Past (Imperfect). In German, the Pluperfect is also called the Past Perfect.

This goes to the end of the subordinate clause and therefore stands behind the Participle II. ("I'd like a [cup of] coffee.") In any case I want to start by explaining to you how you build the Pluperfect with this example of the main clause „Vor vielen Jahren hatte ich mal Deutsch gelernt.“ (Many years ago I happened to learn German“: The rule for structuring the Pluperfect is as follows: Auxiliary verb in the Simple Past (Imperfect) + Participle II (at the end of the sentence). That sounds a little confusing so I shall explain: The rule is that you normally only use the Pluperfect when talking about two actions in the past, one of which was already completed before the other one occurred. Get the latest news and gain access to exclusive updates and offers, Create an account and sign in to access this FREE content, mir das neueste iPad-Modell zum Geburtstag, Co-ordinating conjunctions with two parts. ... Browse other questions tagged subjunctive pluperfect or ask your own question.

In German, the Pluperfect is also called the Past Perfect. Get the latest news and gain access to exclusive updates and offers, Create an account and sign in to access this FREE content. are not used in the Pluperfect in German. the Perfect. The three main forms of the subjunctive are the. In German the subjunctive is called the Konjunktiv and there are two of them. 2 Forming the pluperfect tense.

The pluperfect tense describes things that had happened or were true at a point in the past before something else happened.

In German, subjunctive forms are used much more frequently than in English, to express uncertainty, speculation or doubt. The conjugated verb is, in our case, the auxiliary verb (to have/ to be) in the Simple Past (Imperfect). The present subjunctive of weak, strong and mixed verbs have the same endings. Early on, every beginning student of German learns this common Subjunctive II verb form: möchte (would like), as in "Ich möchte einen Kaffee."

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